Tag Archives: Caregiving

Night Watch

I wrote the notes for this poem on my father’s bed during the wee hours of the night, pen in one hand and his fingers curled around the other. Writing is the best way I know to process emotions and pass through challenging times. It helps me arrange my thoughts and get to the heart of what I’m experiencing. When I arrive at what I feel is a finished poem, essay, or story, I feel a great sense of peace about what has transpired. Continue reading

Paying Back & Living Forward: Ninja Travel with Dad

In an ideal world, family relationships are such that parents care for their children and, after time, those children grow up wanting to care for their parents. This isn’t always the case. Some relationships are too toxic to continue or too fractured to recover. Sometimes distance, severe infirmity, or financial strain stand in the way between what the heart wants and what can actually be accomplished. However, when all else aligns, a child’s ability to payback love and care—in whatever capacity—is one of the greatest joys in life. Such has been, and continues to be, my experience. Continue reading

Love, Death, and Blossoms

It’s been a couple months since I posted my last Mindful Musing—months filled with poignant life events, churning emotions, and deep family love. There were sad and painful moments, hours, days to be sure, but on the whole, those two months overflowed with living. Such was my experience with death. Continue reading

How I Met My Writing Deadline: Caring for Others and Self

An emergency with my elderly parents sent me flying out of the house with a hastily packed bag, numerous tins of whole leaf tea, and of course… my laptop.  What more could a writer need?  When two days turned into nine, I had a few more ideas!  Fortunately, the most important necessity could be found anywhere at any time. Continue reading

Empathy without Suffering

While speaking on the Power of Empathy to graduate students studying for their Masters in Social Working, I saw a need to address how to be empathetic without taking on the pain. Like writers, doctors, artists, caregivers, parents—and any deeply caring individual—these young professionals wondered if there was a way to open their hearts, safely. If you’ve ever wondered the same thing, read on! Continue reading